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Author Topic: Japanese Lesson  (Read 3314 times)

Offline karisuma

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2011, 10:24:12 AM »
what is koto?

Offline kyousukeminato

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2011, 07:07:42 AM »
Umm did you mean just 'koto' or they have line on the top of the 'o' character? Like 'kootoo' or kotoo'?  Because it does make difference with the translation :o. Sorry for the bad english.

Offline dso

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2011, 11:57:12 PM »
Yes, "Ruido" is spanish for "Noise" but I think YUI named it after a live house called RUIDO in Japan and that's why she talks about a live and a girl on stage in the song.

Offline RyanKun

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2011, 02:08:44 PM »
Quote from: "dso"
Yes, "Ruido" is spanish for "Noise" but I think YUI named it after a live house called RUIDO in Japan and that's why she talks about a live and a girl on stage in the song.
enough for me thanks  :lol:

i must take japanese lesson for real , it seems impossible to ask anything about japan here   :sry

Offline CHU-LIP

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #19 on: October 11, 2011, 11:57:28 AM »
Okay, instead of just translating stuff, let's actually learn to understand~ ;D

So, my question...

What is the difference in using か (ga) and  は (h/wa) ?

How would you know when to use か instead of は when forming a sentence?

I know that は in used to indicate the topic we're talking about, so when / why is  か used when forming a sentence?

I'll be→ ♪ 「もし孤独に負けそうならねぇ、好きな歌を聴いてみてほしい」

 ♥ → ♪last.fm → ×twitter → ♫NICOとニュース

Offline Cybergeron89

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #20 on: October 11, 2011, 01:26:16 PM »
What next step would u recommend (as a self learning) after getting familiar with kana?
« Last Edit: October 11, 2011, 01:40:24 PM by Cybergeron89 »

Offline xerith

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2011, 03:11:34 PM »
Quote from: "CHU-LIP"
Okay, instead of just translating stuff, let's actually learn to understand~ ;D

So, my question...

What is the difference in using

Offline Ids

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2011, 06:59:40 AM »
Quote from: "CHU-LIP"
Okay, instead of just translating stuff, let's actually learn to understand~ ;D

So, my question...

What is the difference in using

Offline cyclo

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2011, 10:46:58 AM »
Quote from: "CHU-LIP"
Okay, instead of just translating stuff, let's actually learn to understand~ ;D

So, my question...

What is the difference in using か (ga) and  は (h/wa) ?

How would you know when to use か instead of は when forming a sentence?

I know that は in used to indicate the topic we're talking about, so when / why is  か used when forming a sentence?

http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/particlesintro

This is a great site for learning Japanese grammar. Ga and wa are very well differentiated here and it helped me a lot.
I think if you can digest and memorise this entire site, your grammar will be at JLPT3 level at least xD

Enjoy~
Quote from: "Cybergeron89"
What next step would u recommend (as a self learning) after getting familiar with kana?

After you learn kana the next step is to master grammar. The site I posted above should help. Learning all the verb conjugations is a really good way to start, as you will begin to understand how to catch certain words you hear, conjugate them backwards in your mind, and learn the dictionary form of the verb.

Eg. 行く(いく)-> to go (dictionary form), but you will often only hear 行かない(いかない)、行きます(いきます)、行きません(いきません)、行こう(いこう)、行け(いけ)、行けば(いけば)、行くな(いくな)、行けません(いけません)、行って(いって)etc. If you learn to understand how all these conjugations come about and what they mean, learning the dictionary form of a word is as good as learning ALL those words!


(my bad, I typed the bottom half all out and realised you asked AFTER learning kana =.= I'll just leave it here for other interested readers..)

If you are referring to learning and memorizing hiragana and katakana, this site works wonders: http://www.realkana.com/

You can select the columns of hiragana and katakana you want to learn in the tabs, then click on practice. This will cause the site to randomly generate a character from the columns you selected, and you won't be able to progress until you have typed in the correct romaji for that character. Keep doing the practice for an hour and I'm sure you'd have mastered most of the kana :)

If you are referring to learning Kanji, there is no easy way around it. The key to remembering Kanji characters is WRITING THEM OUT. Write out a new character you've learnt at least 10 times, each time reminding yourself the various ways of reading that character (Kun-yomi and On-yomi), this will help you to, all at once, learn how to write, read, speak, and listen to that character!

For me, when I'm on the road, I use an offline mobile dictionary on my iPod touch called Kotoba. Whenever I somehow think of a word I don't know (eg. while listening to music) or just happened to be thinking about a word I know, but forgot how to write, I look it up and learn it over again :) Slowly but surely, my vocabulary is expanding.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2011, 11:07:00 AM by cyclo »

Offline Datalore

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #24 on: October 23, 2011, 05:32:26 AM »
Learn nihongo is cool !!  :good
Can you indicate to me a dictionary to download ??
Ideograms Kanji to english.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2011, 06:50:51 AM by Datalore »

Offline MonkOfWar

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #25 on: October 25, 2011, 05:36:34 AM »
What happens to a verb when you attach its polite 'base' to the suffix -kirenai 切れない?

Sample words:

待ち切れない tachikirenai 'Tachi' comes from 'tatsu' for 'cut'

断ち切れない machikirenai 'Machi' comes from 'matsu' for 'wait'

I know that 「切れない」 on its own means 'not cut' but when you combine the words as above I'm all confused.....


Offline Datalore

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2011, 08:08:59 AM »
Now I found this topic that has kanji dictionary and several other useful sites for learning japanese language.
Link.
http://forum.yui-lover.com?topic=524904/1/

OK !!

Offline Hatsumichan

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #27 on: November 05, 2011, 09:01:56 PM »
Quote from: "CHU-LIP"
Okay, instead of just translating stuff, let's actually learn to understand~ ;D

So, my question...

What is the difference in using か (ga) and  は (h/wa) ?

How would you know when to use か instead of は when forming a sentence?

I know that は in used to indicate the topic we're talking about, so when / why is  か used when forming a sentence?

Okay!  So on top of everyone else's answers, I'm throwing in what I learned from some books on Japanese grammar that were actually written in Japanese for Japanese students about this whole 「が」 and 「は」 issue.  Because it's a really hard topic that even Japanese people can't really explain off the top of their heads to foreigners.

Some quotes (and their translations) from the book for you:

「が」 は、一時的な現象や状態を表す場合に用いられます。
"ga" is used in cases when one wants to express a temporary phenomenon or condition.

「は」 は、一般的な性質や状態を表す場合に用いられます。
"ha" (pronounced "wa") is used in cases when one wants to express a general property or condition.

例:     Examples:
海が青い。  The sea is blue.
風がすずしい。  The wind is cool.
雪は白い。  Snow is white.
氷は冷たい。  Ice is cold.
山がきれいだ。 The mountain is pretty.
努力が大切だ。 Putting in effort is important.
車は便利だ。 Cars are convenient/handy.


So in the examples, things that are described with "ha" are more or less generally accepted to be as they have been described.  Snow is white.  Ice is cold.  Cars are convenient/handy.  Maybe if you're from Antarctica you may not find ice as cold as the rest of us, and maybe if you can teleport from place to place, cars may not be convenient for you, but in general these things are accepted to be true, and therefore are described with "ha."  

Things described with "ga" are more temporary, as in they could change in a few days or even a few hours, depending on when you said it, and even depending on who said it.  So in the morning, the sea could be blue, but at night, when it's not reflecting the sky, it would be black which is why "ga" is used in that sentence.  The mountain is pretty now, but in a few days when winter sets in, it will be barren.  Putting in effort is important now to me, but in a few days when I don't have a deadline or a competition, it may not be important to me anymore.  And on that note, maybe I think it's important, but you might not.  This is why "ga" is used in those sentences above.

In the example on the other page that cyclo posted, if you are stating the fact that you are a student, the rest of the world will accept that fact and believe that you are a student. "Watashi ha gakusei desu (私は学生です)." Even though you may not be a student for forever, the fact is is that for a period of however long, you will be a student and it's not going to change right away (in general - we'll disregard students who say they are students when they are about to graduate in a day or something).  For "Watashi ga gakusei desu (私が学生です)," as explained by the website, you are most likely responding to something that someone asked, and therefore, you would only be THAT SPECIFIC student that the person is asking about for a temporary amount of time.  Two days later, he could be asking about a different student.  Which is where the "ga" and "ha" differentiation comes in.

The important verbs that more or less always use "ga" also describe temporary things.  "Suki (好き) - to like," "kirai (嫌い) - to hate" "iru (居る) - to be/to exist (living/animate things)" "aru (ある) - to be/to exist/to have (non-living/inanimate things)"  You can like one thing one second and hate it the next.  A person can be next to you one second and then not be there the next.

It's a hard topic to understand and I mess them up all the time still (I heard that even Japanese people sometimes mess them up), but I hope this helped you understand "ga" and "ha" a little more than you did before  :good

Quote from: "MonkOfWar"
What happens to a verb when you attach its polite 'base' to the suffix -kirenai 切れない?

Sample words:

待ち切れない tachikirenai 'Tachi' comes from 'tatsu' for 'cut'

断ち切れない machikirenai 'Machi' comes from 'matsu' for 'wait'

I know that 「切れない」 on its own means 'not cut' but when you combine the words as above I'm all confused.....

You switched your kanji around (I got really confused for a second lol); the top one is "machikirenai" and the bottom one is "tachikirenai" but anyway...

「切れない」 when attached to the "stem/base (whatever you wanna call it)" form of verbs means that whatever verb you were doing was "too much/too many/too long/too burdensome to finish or complete."  So 待ち切れない (machikirenai) is translated as "I can't wait!" (either in a good meaning or a bad meaning).  It's basically expressing that there's too much time left so you can't wait (待ち) any longer.  断ち切れない (tachikirenai) would be translated as "I can't cut them off/I can't break this off!" in terms of enemies that can't be cut off (断ち) because there are too many of them, or a relationship that is in too deep so you can't break it off (断ち) anymore.  Another example would be 数え切れない (kazoekirenai) which is translated as "countless" which is basically, there are too many to count (数え).

Hope that helped.  :good

Offline azmikun

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #28 on: November 07, 2011, 06:47:18 AM »
try to add another difference between は and が

1. 「が」は新しい情報を表す。"ga" used to show a new information
2. 「は」は旧情報を表す。"wa" used to show an old information.

for example :

- むかしむかし、ある所におじいさんとおばあさんおりました。おじいさん山へ芝刈りに出掛けました。
Once upon a time, there lived a grandpa and a granny. One day, the grandpa went to the mountain to gather firewood.


おじいさんとおばあさんおりました。<- the noun ojiisan and obbasan is attached with が because it's the first time ojiisan and obaasan introduced, it means that is a new information.

おじいさん山へ芝刈りに出掛けました。<- in the next sentence the noun ojiisan is attached with は because ojiisan is an old information and have been intoroduced before.

「が」that attached with the noun on the sentences is 「不定・indefinite」and 「は」is 「定・definite」in term of 文法カテゴリー(gramatical category).


hope you all understand because I have no idea how to explain well in english lol

Offline Mysterious Guy

Japanese Lesson
« Reply #29 on: June 01, 2012, 01:18:46 AM »
Is Japanese grammar like Chinese/Manderin grammar? Because I know little to no Japanese and want to know if my knowledge of Chinese can help accelerate my learning of Japanese.